Animator’s Survival Kit – First two lectures

I’ve discovered only 2 of these fantastic lectures online, so as long as they exist I will keep them on Regurge for all to see!

Lecture 1 has incredible tips Richard Williams learned while watching Ken Harris, Art Babbitt, and Milt Kahl; the originators of many techniques all animators strive to accomplish everyday.

Lecture 2 covers the elements of timing and spacing in animation. This one does come off as rudimentary, but you will obtain profound knowledge by watching how he teaches it; what he skims over and what he highlights.

 

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John Truby’s Strongest Storywriting Tips

John Truby  breaks down elements found in the most successful film concepts we know of today. He could be talking about Christopher Nolan’s Cobb character from “Inception”, or Bob Parr from Brad Bird’s “The Incredibles”. Hopefully, my animators out there will understand that the most successful animations (whether features, short films,  or 11 second club entries) are the ones who present characters that live outside of the screen time we give them. Once we have that, we can move on to making sure they’re characters that actually entertain other people.

Important tip to note: Allowing the plot to come from the character means giving the story writing to your character, while you just try to copy everything he describes. Don’t force the character into a pre-planned scenario; They’ll never really come alive. 

When Critiquing your peers….

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Have you ever given a critique on your friend’s animation and wondered why your excellent suggestions weren’t applied? Maybe you were saying the right things, but at the wrong time. Often times, the following phrase has rung true whenever my peers (including myself) were found on the chopping block:

The closer you get to being finished, the less critiques you want to hear from other people

So you can wish your friend chose your “Zombie Apocalypse alternate ending” idea, but the probability of them going back to 1st keys for your concept may be a bit too much to hope for. As a result, I’ve assembled the Animation Critiquing Poster for anyone to download, apply, or re-use.

Usually, the best way to help your peers is to:

1) Assess what stage they are in

2) Apply critiques that will help them finish the project, without slowing them down

If it’s not good, oh well! It’s better that they finish, so they can move on to another project and make that one into greatness.

The Last Airbender’s 60 page FX Guide

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If you’re working on a 2D film that requires a few effects, then these Avatar pages are just for you. This was posted 2 years ago on a site dedicated to hosting all of the greatest effects animation tips and pieces that exist on the internet to date. In addition to the Avatar guide, I’ll also leave a downloadable link to the 207 page pdf full of effects animation notes that Ron Doucet (TV animation director, 14 years of experience) scanned throughout his career.

Avatar effects guide:
http://flashfx.blogspot.com/2011/06/avatar-effects-guide.html

Download the 207 page effects design binder here:
http://www.floobynooby.com/pdfs/FX_Design_Binder.pdf